How to Be Patient

Staying Calm Under Pressure

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How patient are you?

The key to everything is patience. You get the chicken by hatching the egg, not by smashing it open. – Arnold Glasow, American humorist

Here's the problem: you're waiting for someone to finish compiling a report that you need for a meeting. Because of an issue that came up, you're already 15 minutes late.

You can feel your body getting tense, and you're getting quite cross. You start sweating, and suddenly you yell at the person for being slow and putting you behind schedule. You can tell she's hurt, but you can't help it. She's making you late!

Does this sound familiar? Many of us are impatient at times. Losing control of our patience hurts not only us, but those around us. Impatience raises our stress level and can even cause physical harm to our bodies. Being impatient can also damage relationships.

In this article, we'll examine strategies that you can use to be more patient.

Why Practice Patience?

Others often see impatient people as arrogant, insensitive, and impulsive. They can be viewed as poor decision makers, because they make quick judgments or interrupt people. Some people will even avoid impatient people, because of their poor people skills and bad tempers.

People with these personality traits are unlikely to be at the top of the list for promotions to leadership positions. Impatience can even affect relationships at home.

The more patient you are with others, the likelier you are to be viewed positively by your peers and your managers, not to mention your family and friends.

Signs of Impatience

How do you know when you're being impatient? You will probably experience one of more of the following symptoms:

  • Shallow breathing (short breaths).
  • Muscle tension.
  • Hand clenching/tightening.
  • Jiggling/restless feet.
  • Irritability/anger.
  • Anxiety/nervousness.
  • Rushing.
  • Snap/quick decisions.

Finding Your Causes

If you experience the symptoms of impatience, your next step is to discover the true cause. Many of us have "triggers." These could be people, phrases, or specific situations (like rush-hour traffic) that regularly cause us to enter an impatient frame of mind.

Make a list of things that cause you to become impatient. If you're having trouble identifying your triggers, use these tips:

  • Stop and think about the last time you were impatient. What caused it? You can narrow this down to the root cause by using the 5 Whys technique.
  • Ask your family, friends, and co-workers about your impatience. Chances are that they know what gets you "wound up".
  • Many people become impatient due to physical factors such as hunger, dehydration, or fatigue. Analyze your body the next time you start to feel impatient. A simple remedy might be a snack and a glass of water!
  • Keep a journal with you to record when you start to feel impatient. Write down what the situation is, and why you're getting frustrated.

Identifying your triggers helps because it forces you to examine your actions and uncover why you're doing what you're doing. This knowledge also helps you devise strategies to avoid becoming impatient.

Of course, it would be great if you could avoid the triggers that make you impatient. But for most of us, that's just not possible. So you have to learn to manage impatience instead.

Managing the Symptoms

When you feel impatient, it's important to get out of this frame of mind as quickly as possible. Try these strategies:

  • Take deep, slow breaths, and count to 10. Doing this helps slow your heart rate, relaxes your body, and distances you emotionally from the situation. If you're feeling really impatient, you might need to do a longer count, or do this several times.
  • Impatience can cause you to tense your muscles involuntarily. So, consciously focus on relaxing your body . Again, take slow, deep breaths. Relax your muscles, from your toes up to the top of your head.
  • Learn to manage your emotions . Remember, you have a choice in how you react in every situation. You can choose to be patient, or choose not to be: it's all up to you.
  • Force yourself to slow down. Make yourself speak and move more slowly. It will appear to others as if you're calm – and, by "acting" patient, you can often "feel" more patient.
  • Practice active listening and empathic listening . Make sure you give other people your full attention, and patiently plan your response to what they say.
  • Remind yourself that your impatience rarely gets others to move faster – in fact, it can interfere with other people's ability to perform complex or highly-skilled work. All you're doing is creating more stress, which is completely unproductive.
  • Try to talk yourself out of your impatient frame of mind. Remind yourself how silly it is that you're reacting this way. People often don't mind if a meeting is delayed, just as long as you let them know that you're running late in advance.
  • If your impatience causes you to react in anger toward others, use anger management techniques to calm down.
  • Some people become impatient because they're perfectionists. However, in addition to causing impatience, perfectionism can actually slow productivity and increase stress. Learn how to stop being a perfectionist with our Coaching Clinic I'm a Perfectionist!

Remember that, although many people are naturally patient, the rest of us need to practice patience for it to become a habit. Becoming more patient won't happen overnight, but do persist – it's so important!

Key Points

Many of us struggle with impatience. But if we want healthy work relationships and a successful career, then we need to spend time making patience a habit.

Start by identifying your triggers. Often a specific person or situation can immediately cause you to become impatient. When you identify the specific causes, you're better able to discover why it's happening. You can then use strategies to overcome your impatience.

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Comments (26)
  • Over a month ago Midgie wrote
    Hi Paul Moses Rajesh,
    Thank you for sharing your lots about being patient. I agree that patience is an exercise and you need to learn how to rise about things so as not to be affected.

    Mind Tools Team
  • Over a month ago Paul Moses Rajesh wrote
    good, but I have been in middle management, have a lot of patience, but when people abuse you verbally, play the fool, play the blame game, patience takes a toss, trust it will psychologically affect you - this is the research report. It will also have adverse affects on your body, when a situation or a company that troubles you, you have to manage your finances and look for the best management or create one, humiliation and patience can't co-exist, abuse and leadership can't co-exist in the long run, if they exist they would have affected you mentally or your physical body health. Recently I did a great number of projects for a company in India, in the OMR belt area where many US companies have outsourced their work to Indian's, what I saw was when I tried to help a certain company, using my linked in knowledge they were trying to secretively use my information for other purposes and were reading my private messages, so ethics, patience are great factors for a company or leadership and much cases I have seen companies don't have it, when someone is trying to steal my intellectual property I can't keep my patience it's better to look for someone trustworthy company who can harness your skills and your patience can be benefited, I read bible for patience!!! patience is a attitude where you know the opponent has done wrong against you and try to defeat him by raising above him with your intuition, patience is a exercise, you have to do everything to live blissfully!!!

    Paul Moses Raj
    Evangelist/ Research/ Human -Psychology Analyst
  • Over a month ago BillT wrote
    Hello Caroline,

    Thank you for your feedback. I acknowledge that some mental health issues demonstrate similar symptoms, but the article here is focusing on symptoms of impatience. The more severe your symptoms, the greater the need for professional guidance and help.

    Mind Tools Team
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