Managing in Ireland

Traditional Customs in a Modern Economy

Managing in Ireland - Traditional Customs in a Modern Economy

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Modern, dynamic Ireland: holding on to traditions and losing the cliches.

The Irish are a people with a strong national identity built on rich tradition and culture, and, with a global diaspora, they have one of the most celebrated cultures, too.

However, as a result, they are often heavily and inaccurately stereotyped as rural, twee, traditional folk who enjoy a Guinness® or two.

Ireland joined the European Community in 1973 and quickly liberalized its economy, enjoying rapid growth from 1995 until 2007. So, what's present-day Ireland like to work in?

The Country

Ireland is in north-west Europe and occupies about 80 percent of the island of Ireland. The other 20 percent is Northern Ireland, which is part of the United Kingdom. To Ireland's west is the Atlantic Ocean and to its east is the Irish Sea. Its climate is characterized by mild winters, cool summers and plenty of rain.

Ireland has a population of 4.5 million people, most of whom live in Dublin, the country's capital. Its currency has been the Euro since 1999.

Tip:

Preparing for the elements is essential in Ireland, a country that can experience all four seasons in one day! Whether you're exploring city life or the beautiful hills, lakes and coastline, ensure you bring a good mix of clothes, so you don't get caught out.

Ireland is in north-west Europe and occupies about 80 percent of the island of Ireland. The other 20 percent is Northern Ireland, which is part of the United Kingdom.

Ireland and Northern Ireland

Ireland and Northern Ireland are separate countries; it is important not to confuse the two. The Irish republic that we know today was formed after centuries of rule by England over the entire island. In 1801, a political agreement came into effect that united the Kingdom of Great Britain and the Kingdom of Ireland to form the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. However, by 1880 rebellion was brewing. In 1921, the island was split into the largely pro-Union, Protestant Northern Ireland, which remained part of the United Kingdom, and the Nationalist, Catholic Irish Free State. Ireland became fully independent in 1949.

From the 1960s until the late 1990s, the violent "Troubles" mostly occurred in Northern Ireland and the mainland U.K., but people south and west of the border were affected too. A peace settlement known as the Good Friday Agreement was reached in 1998 and has been implemented, albeit with difficulties.

The nation's history is sensitive, and it is best not to talk about it unless it is brought up by your host. Take his or her lead on the subject and, instead, listen, learn and understand....

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