How to Manage a Probationary Period Effectively

Helping People Get up to Speed

How to Manage a Probationary Period Effectively - Helping People Get up to Speed

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Use probationary periods to ensure that your new hires are a good fit with your team.

New manager Lena has recently recruited Dialla, who is on a three-month probationary period. Two and a half months in, and Lena's not sure that she made the right decision.

Dialla is often late into work, and she still hasn't got to grips with the team's processes and ways of working. And, while Dialla has a great "can do"' attitude, Lena wonders why she isn't up to speed yet.

Lena hasn't yet raised her concerns with Dialla, but she knows that she needs to soon. Perhaps Dialla has a genuine reason for her lateness, or doesn't have the right equipment to do her job properly.

In this article, we'll explore why it's important to address issues early in the probation process, and how to get the most from your new starter.

Why Probation Matters

Most companies ask new starters, or those in newly promoted positions, to work a probationary period. This is a fixed amount of time, usually between one and six months, during which managers decide whether the team member has the right skills, attitude and behavior to do the job. It also gives joiners the chance to assess whether the role lives up to their expectations and ambitions.

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