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Leadership Styles Video

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Learn how to use a variety of different frameworks and styles to become a more effective leader.

The most effective leaders know that leadership is not a "one-size-fits-all" approach. They adapt their style to fit each unique situation.

When you understand the different leadership frameworks and approaches available, you're better able to guide your team through challenging situations.

For instance, psychologist Kurt Lewin identified three major leadership styles and, in his framework, gives a popular way to think about leadership. One of these is autocratic leadership. Leaders who use this style make decisions without talking to their team. What they say, goes. 

The autocratic leadership style can be demoralizing, but it's often effective in emergency or crisis situations.

Another one of Lewin's leadership styles is democratic leadership. Leaders who use this style still have the final say, but they include their team in the decision-making process. 

Democratic leadership is empowering, and encourages creativity. But it can be ineffective when you need to make a quick decision. 

The last of Lewin's styles is laissez-faire leadership. Laissez-faire leaders give their team a lot of freedom in how they do their work. This autonomy can lead to high job satisfaction, but it can backfire if team members don't know how to manage their time well.

Another effective leadership style that Lewin doesn't talk about is transformational leadership. Transformational leaders have integrity and high emotional intelligence. They're good communicators, and they motivate their team with a shared vision of the future. 

These leaders are authentic, empathetic, humble, and inspirational. However, their magic can quickly fade if they get carried away by giving short deadlines and expecting others to work long hours.

As you can imagine, there are many more approaches and frameworks you can use to lead your team. And there's no one style that works for all situations. When you understand the different approaches available, you can tailor your own leadership style to better fit the situation you're in. 

To learn more about leadership styles, see the article that accompanies this video.

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Comments (10)
  • Over a month ago Yolande wrote
    Hi Tort

    Welcome to the MindTools Club and to the forums as well - it's great to 'hear' your voice so soon!

    Thanks for sharing your thoughts on leadership and management with us. I think your definitions of both management and leadership are spot on. I loved what you said about leadership: If you are a one trick pony, authentic leadership will not be sustainable and acknowledging where your strengths lie and recognizing the strengths of your team allows you to be a leader and a follower.It is indeed so that a 'one trick pony' will not be able to sustain authentic leadership since leadership implies flexibility and being able to act according to the here and now.

    I hope you will share more of your insights with us; do have a look at the other forums too such as Career Cafe Central. The forums are where we all help and learn from one another (and sometimes we can just let off steam there too!).

    Tort, if you need any help around the forums please let me know - I'd be only too glad to help where I can.

    Kind regards
    Yolandé
  • Over a month ago Tort wrote
    The ablity to balance leadership and management is a skill to be admired. Would it be wrong to say that management is 'managing' or the effective use of resources - physical, financial, human resources and time?
    Leadership is the relationship used to influcence people to achieve something. That relationship may be context or circumstance based - Military style command and control or emergency services (police, fire) in a life or death situation to inspiring, coaching, mentoring and influencing in a more relaxed setting such as non-profit, political, social, community or sports.

    The position of your leadership style depends on how you need to apply it. Standing out in front directing (police) or inspiring
    Walking alongside or standing on the sidelines (coach)
    Or standing back and encouraging (cheerleader)
    Great leaders adapt to their situation to be able to apply the most relevant style to the situation and sometimes that is following too.

    If you are a one trick pony, authentic leadership will not be sustainable and acknowledging where your strenghts lie and recognizing the strengths of your team allows you to be a be a leader and a follower.
  • Over a month ago Yolande wrote
    Hi Abishek

    Welcome to the Club and also to the forums - it's great 'hearing' your voice over here. Yes, I agree with you - it is indeed a combination of the things mentioned in the article that makes a great leader. I am interested to hear your opinion: which of these things do you think is the most important for a leader to do, or do you see them all as equal?

    Kind regards
    Yolandé
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