By Liz Cook and the Mind Tools Team
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Starbursting

Understanding New Ideas by Brainstorming Questions

Starbursting

© iStockphoto
Gilmanshin

Start your brainstorming with a bang!

When a colleague suggests a new product or idea, and you're trying to understand it and how it works, a typical response is to bombard the other person with questions: What features would it have? How much would it cost? Where would we market it? Who would buy it? And so on.

Asking questions like these is a valuable way of understanding the new idea, and of challenging it to ensure that all of the relevant aspects of it have been considered before any work begins on implementing it. To get the most out of this approach, it's important that the questions are asked in a systematic and comprehensive way.

That's why it’s worth going through a comprehensive, systematic questioning exercise every time you explore a new idea. Starbursting is useful way of doing this.

Starbursting is a form of brainstorming that focuses on generating questions rather than answers. It can be used iteratively, with further layers of questioning about the answers to the initial set of questions. For example, a colleague suggests a new design of ice skating boot. One question you ask might be “Who is the customer?” Answer: "Skaters". But you need to go further than this to ensure that you target your promotions accurately: “What kind of skaters?” Answer: "Those who do a lot of jumping, who need extra support", and so on. This would help focus the marketing, for example to competition ice dancers and figure skaters, rather than ice rinks that buy boots to hire out to the general public.

Tip:

If you want to explore a really significant proposal, make sure you also use techniques like Risk Analysis and Impact Analysis to explore the questions you should ask.

How to Use the Tool

The best way to see the power of this simple but effective technique is to think of a product, challenge or issue to work on, and follow these steps:

Step 1

Download our free template and print it out or take a large sheet of paper, draw a large six-pointed star in the middle, and write your idea, product or challenge in the center.

Step 2

Write the words "Who", "What", "Why," "Where," "When," and "How" at the tip of each point of the star.

Step 3

Brainstorm questions about the idea or product starting with each of these words. The questions radiate out from the central star. Don't try to answer any of the questions as you go along. Instead, concentrate on thinking up as many questions as you can.

Step 4

Depending on the scope of the exercise, you may want to have further starbursting sessions to explore the answers to these initial questions further.

Figure 1 below shows some of the questions you might generate in a short starbursting session, focused on the skates mentioned above.

Figure 1 – Starbursting Diagram for New Product

Starbursting Diagram Example

Key Points

Starbursting is a form of brainstorming used to generate questions in a systematic, comprehensive way.

It's a useful tool to support your problem solving or decision making processes by helping you to understand all aspects and options more fully.

Download Template

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Comments (11)
  • Over a month ago Odusanya wrote
    This is an excellent and easy tool for probing
  • Over a month ago Michele wrote
    Hi Aurablue,

    We're pleased that you found this resource helpful.

    Michele
    Mind Tools Team
  • Over a month ago Aurablue wrote
    Our organization has been so focused on obtaining results that we have lost the art of asking questions. Its been a struggle trying to put together a facilitation that would encourage participation and develop the skill of asking questions. Starbursting is a great step in the right direction. I can't wait to try this method with our Technological Services folks.
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